Timeline of the FUTURE

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Timeline of the FUTURE

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 02:38

Good to read high!! :hair :hair :mrgreen:
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2025 AD For those under the age of 50, there is now real and genuine hope of being able to live indefinitely.
i'll explain later...

[url]futuretimeline.net/index.htm[/url]
The first post will be the "boring part" 2012 - early 2020
Here we go. Buckle Up Bitches!!!!!!one!!!!eleven!!!!! :mrgreen: :D :mrgreen: :D :twisted: :twisted:

2014 AD

The Internet has a greater reach than television

Citizens in developed nations now rely on the Internet more than any other medium for news coverage. This trend* first became apparent in the early 2000s, when radio was overtaken by Internet usage. The rapid shift towards web-based information then began to affect print media, with newspaper sales being heavily impacted.

By 2014, the trend has continued, with even television now having less reach when it comes to news reporting. Television and the Internet are in fact converging together as one. Social media, mobile technologies and exponential bandwidth improvements have driven much of this change.
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The Large Hadron Collider reaches its maximum operating power
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Terabyte SD cards are available

SD cards and other memory devices continue to grow exponentially this decade, with storage capacities doubling roughly every year. A terabyte is equal to 1000 gigabytes.
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2015 AD

The world's first fully sustainable, zero-carbon, zero-waste city

The first phase of Masdar City - a $22 billion eco-project - is completed in 2015. This huge development is located outside of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. Entirely pre-planned and self-contained, it is the world's first carbon neutral, zero waste and fully sustainable city. A multitude of green technologies are utilised - including a solar power plant, rooftop photovoltaics, wind farms, geothermal sources and a hydrogen power plant. The city's water needs are fulfilled by a solar-powered desalination plant. There are extensive recycling systems too.

Masdar City will initially be home to around 7,000 residents and 15,000 commuters. Its commercial sector is primarily concerned with the manufacture of environmentally-friendly products. Automobiles are banned from the city, residents instead using integrated forms of mass transit and personal rapid transit. It is connected to the rest of Abu Dhabi through rail and existing roadways. It contains a university and an institute of science and technology.

Masdar City will undergo major expansion. The final phase of the project will be completed by 2025, covering an area of 6 sq km (2.3 sq mi). By then, it will contain over 50,000 residents and 1,500 businesses.
Masdar City Ariel Fly Through
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3D printing is a mainstream consumer product

Until recently, this technology was extremely expensive - upwards of $15,000 per machine - and limited to use in industrial prototyping, product design, medical modeling and architectural models.* However, plummeting costs are now making it affordable to consumers.**

Rather than using ink on paper, these machines can actually "print" 3D objects. This is achieved by melting nylon powder and then shaping it based on computer instructions.

Countless different items can be produced – from jewellery and decorative giftware, to children's toys, kitchenware, replacement plugs, hooks, pipes, fittings, flooring and other household essentials.

Users can download new items and configurations from the Web.* Artists and hobbyists can even create their own, using these printers in combination with 3D scanners and modeling software.

In addition to falling costs, another reason that home 3D printing has taken off rapidly is that there is very little manufacturing being done in America and various other countries anymore. As a result, there is little or no pressure by manufacturing special interests against it.

In the decades ahead, this technology will evolve into nanofabricators, capable of reproducing items with atomic precision within minutes. It will ultimately lead to matter replicators with near-instantaneous production of virtually any object – including foodstuffs.
uPrint Personal 3D Printer - Graphics Systems Corp
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Scientists resurrect the woolly mammoth


2016 AD

New drug delivery methods for brain-related conditions



2017 AD

Tooth regeneration is transforming dental care
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Portable medical lasers that seal wounds

Handheld, Star Trek-style devices that can seal wounds are now seeing widespread use. A specially controlled laser works in combination with a blood protein called albumin. Heated at just the right temperature, this forms a natural "glue" after the skin has cooled. Using this method allows a wound to be stronger, water-tight and less likely to scar than traditional stitches.
Following several years of development, they are used in many hospitals now.
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Teleportation of simple molecules

For a number of years, scientists had been teleporting individual atoms and particles of light. By this date, the first molecules such as water and carbon dioxide have been teleported. This will be followed in the 2030s by complex organic molecules such as DNA and proteins.
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2018 AD

A drug to prevent obesity

A drug that lets people eat whatever they want without gaining weight is being developed.* This works by "switching off" the fat insulin receptor gene. Though initially expensive, there is enormous demand for this product, which leads to a major drop in obesity levels throughout the developed world - especially in countries like the USA, which until now had been experiencing a crisis in this regard. Average life expectancy is increased as a result, since there are less people dying of heart-related illnesses.
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2019 AD

Bionic Eye
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Connected vehicle technology is being deployed in a number of countries
By communicating with each other and the roadway infrastructure, cars now have greatly improved safety, while traffic congestion and carbon emissions are reduced. In fact, the technology is so effective that in some countries, accident fatalities are cut by 80%.
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Acute spinal injuries are fully treatable
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2020 AD

Generation X is reshaping global politics

As the new decade begins, a fresh generation of leaders and decision-makers is now emerging on the world stage. With the last of the Silent Generation passing away, and the Baby Boomers waning in their influence, the so-called "Generation X" is coming into power.

Born between the late 1960s and early 1980s, Gen-Xers are more heterogeneous than previous groups: diverse in race, class, culture and ethnicity. They are more liberal and progressive than their parents,* with less respect for rules, authority and established policies. They are less likely to be religious. For most or all of their lives, they have grown up surrounded by computers – making them savvy and comfortable with technology, flexible and more open to new ideas. They have more concern for the environment, are more likely to believe in climate change and are generally more accepting of science.

Angry at the social, political and economic legacy bequeathed to them, the Gen-Xers are using their newfound power to build a different kind of world. They are no longer willing to bow to the demands of the Baby Boomers - who many feel have robbed them of their future. They are also not willing to let the Millennials (Generation Y) get a free ride when it comes to paying their fair share.*

From 2020 onwards, there is a shift of money and resources away from senior citizens and towards those in their middle years. Property and inheritance laws, pensions, retirement plans and a number of elderly benefits undergo significant changes, as Gen-Xers work to stem the gap between themselves and their parents.

Banks and financial institutions are finally reformed this decade - though not without a fight, and not to the extent that many voters would prefer. However, there is now at least some focus on long term accountability, rather than short term profits and risk-taking. Employees gain more rights, freedoms and flexibility in the workplace, with offices becoming more casual and informal. Social media and other technologies continue to drive the spread of democracy around the world.

Thanks to the Gen-Xers, many countries begin to relax their laws on private recreational drug use, gay marriage, prostitution, euthanasia and so on. Legalisation and taxation of cannabis adds significantly to government revenues whilst helping to lower crime rates. Scientific research and environmental protection are given higher priorities. These trends were emerging in any case, but are now being accelerated by the Gen-Xers.
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Internet use reaches 5 billion worldwide

The number of Internet users has now reached almost 5 billion - equivalent to the entire world's population in 1987. This compares with 1.7 billion users in 2010 and only 360 million in 2000.
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Texting by thinking
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Complex organ replacements grown from stem cells
As well as the heart, various other organs are developed over the subsequent decade: lungs, livers, kidneys, spleens, stomachs and sexual organs all become available by 2030. Internal organ failure is gradually becoming a thing of the past; for those who can afford the treatments, at least.

Combined with new vitrification techniques (which allow organ banking without damage from ice crystal formation), this is a major breakthrough in longevity extension.
Last edited by Floyduss on Jan 11. 2013, 00:55, edited 11 times in total.
'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

Real products that activate dormant spiritual abilities. http://www.realmdynamics.com/#_a_174
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 02:50

2022 AD

Nanotech clothing is growing in popularity

A variety of nanotech clothing is becoming mainstream now. This includes the first truly waterproof garments. These are made from polyester fibres coated with millions of silicone filaments. They are structured in such a way that water simply falls off, without leaving any dampness.*

Other textiles utilising nanotechnology include self-cleaning carpets. Millions of tiny fingers, embedded in the fabric, gently sway and lean towards the edge of the room, shifting dust and other garbage in a matter of minutes. Collectors fixed into the skirting board then gather and dispose of any detritus as necessary. This has already been used in hotels, luxury apartments and high-grade office buildings - but is now entering the consumer market thanks to falling costs.

Nanotech is also being used extensively by the military, as well as police forces. Ultra-lightweight but extraordinarily impact-resistant jackets and body armour are becoming available. Fireproof suits can also be made safer using these new materials.
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Piezoelectric nanowires are appearing in high-end products

The piezoelectric effect, in which crystalline materials under mechanical stress produce an electric current, is now being utilised at the nanoscale level to power a variety of devices.*

Tiny vibrations - such as those created by wind, sound waves, friction, and even the turbulence of blood flow - can be captured and harnassed by a nanowire mesh. The bending of this mesh in response to these subtle forces can generate over 200 millivolts.

This form of self-powering technology is so sensitive, it can even be embedded in clothing. For instance, the subtle movements of a belt, shirt or trouser pocket can produce enough power to charge the batteries of a cell phone.

Implantable medical devices benefit particularly well from this. Hearing aids, for example, no longer require batteries since they can be powered by sound waves hitting them. Meanwhile, bone-loss monitors and other sensors can be activated by stresses to the body - then beam an alert signal to a computer.

Piezoelectric nanowires have a range of other applications. They can be used in engineering, for example, to detect microscopic fractures in an aeroplane or spacecraft. They can also be used in identity verification: a grid of piezoelectric wires underneath a signature pad (or other touchscreen device) can be used to record the pattern of pressure applied, which is then checked against a database.
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Deafness is fully curable

Recent advances in stem cell research have provided a method of regenerating sensory cells within the inner ear. Humans are born with 30,000 cochlear and vestibular hair cells per ear. Unlike many animal species, they are unable to regenerate these when they are damaged. However, experiments with mice showed that it was possible to induce stem cells - as well as reprogrammed fibroblasts - into creating enough replacement hair cells to fully restore hearing. This process was then replicated in people.*

Using the patient's own skin as a source of stem cells means that the replacements are a perfect genetic match for their body, avoiding issues of immune rejection. This form of therapy also enables a variety of other ailments to be treated, such as balance disorders and tinnitus.
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2025 AD

Human brain simulations are becoming possible

The exponential growth of computer processing power has made it possible to form accurate models of every part of the human brain.* Between 2000 and 2025, there is a millionfold increase in computational power, along with vastly improved scanning resolution and bandwidth.

Until recently, only separate regions of the brain had been fully modelled - but scientists are now able to combine them into one giant, complete simulation. Like the Human Genome Project of the 1990s, there were many in the scientific community who doubted the brain could be mapped so quickly. Once again, they failed to account for the exponential growth of information technology (rather than linear).
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Medical nanobots are being developed

Nano-scale robots - orders of magnitude smaller than earlier micro-sized versions - are being developed as part of efforts to improve healthcare. In some countries they have reached the human trial stage and will soon be approved by government. Utilised in medical research and treatments, their size will enable them to reach places in the body that were simply inaccessible before or too delicate for conventional instruments to operate on.

In the coming years, the most important breakthroughs will be in the treatment of cancer. Using nanobots, it will be possible to detect tumours earlier than ever before and target them with far more precision. In the 2030s, over 90% of cancers will be cured as a result of this. Even patients who would previously have been classed as "terminally ill" will routinely be saved. Monitoring of heart conditions, neurological disorders and many other illnesses will also improve dramatically. Combined with enormous strides in stem cell research, this will create a new generation of medical treatments reaching a whole new level of sophistication and efficiency.

The nanobots themselves are built on a molecule-by-molecule basis, via positionally-controlled diamond mechanosynthesis and diamondoid nanofactories. Each robot is capable of propelling itself using tiny motors and is equipped with microscopic sensing, guidance and communication devices.

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Vertical farms are appearing in cities

In an effort to deal with potential food and water shortages, many cities are now building vertical farms.* There are tremendous cost advantages of sourcing food locally, and the farms often use genetic modification processes, allowing them to harvest crops faster.
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Progress with longevity extension

The potential for radical life extension is beginning to enter the public consciousness. Experiments at a university have yielded the first 10 year old mice. This robust rejuvenation is a major step towards halting the ageing process in people, since mice and humans share similar DNA.*

For those under the age of 50, there is now real and genuine hope of being able to live indefinitely. Though a permanent cure for humans is still many years away, a number of therapies are now in development which can greatly reduce the cell damage, mitochondrial mutations and other adverse effects of ageing. These temporary measures can be used to buy time for the more dramatic advances in the years ahead - creating a "bridge" to the next era of medical breakthroughs.

This period sees the beginning of major public interest and awareness of the subject. At the same time, however, there is a great deal of opposition from religious institutions and conservative groups.
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Wireless electricity is ubiquitous

All electric/electronic appliances now have antennas in place of batteries, and draw power from a single power node mounted in the ceiling of a room – eliminating the need for multiple wall sockets and bulky cables. This greatly reduces clutter in homes and offices.

A magnetic coil is housed in a small box, which can be set into a wall or ceiling. Powered by mains, this resonates at a specific frequency. Electromagnetic waves are transmitted through the air. These are received by a second magnetic coil, fitted in the laptop/TV or other appliance. This resonates at the same frequency as the first coil and absorbs energy, charging the product.

This technology began with small, short-range devices such as phone charger pads and electric toothbrush holders. Improving efficiency made it possible to beam power over distances of many metres. This allowed it to spread to larger and more energy-hungry products, such as televisions, computers and even vehicles. A universal standard was also adopted – ensuring compatibility and greatly expanding its mass market appeal.

The system is completely safe to humans. By the late 2020s, it is ubiquitous in homes and workplaces throughout the developed world.

Eventually, power lines begin to disappear from streets, with electricity passed wirelessly from building to building. Laptop users in cafes and airport terminals are able to utilise "WiTricity" hotspots. This does for battery life what WiFi did for the Internet.
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2028 AD

Printed electronics are ubiquitous
The printed electronics market has seen exponential growth. By now, it has ballooned to over $300 billion globally - even overtaking the silicon integrated circuit industry.

This technology began with a small number of niche, high-end products. It expanded rapidly in the 2010s, thanks to plummeting costs and improved production methods. By the 2020s it had exploded into the mainstream – creating a whole new generation of ultra-thin electronics.

Today, these have such low fabrication costs that they are ubiquitous, being present in countless everyday business and consumer applications. Many previously bulky and heavy devices can now be folded, stored or carried as easily as sheets of paper. This includes flexible TV displays that can be rolled or hung like posters, wearable mobile phones, electronic newspapers with moving pictures, disposable netbooks, "smart" packaging and labels with animated text, signage in retail outlets that can be updated shop-wide at the touch of a button.

Multimedia players with expandable, fold-out touchscreens are especially popular. Even low-end models are now the size and weight of credit cards and can easily fit inside a wallet. With petabytes of storage, gigapixels of screen resolution and superfast transfer speeds, they are millions of times more powerful than iPods of previous decades. They are also completely wireless - no cables or physical connections of any kind are required, and music can be enjoyed using wireless earphones.
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Amputees can regrow lost limbs

Drugs are now available that can stimulate human cells to regrow entire limbs.* By switching off a particular gene known as P21, adult mammalian cells can be induced to behave like regenerative embryonic stem cells.*

The treatments are applied transiently during the healing process and only locally at the wound site, minimising any side effects. Further into the future, even damaged brains will be fully regenerated, using this and other methods.
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2029 AD

Human-like AI is becoming a reality]

A major milestone is reached in the field of AI this year, as a computer passes the Turing Test for the first time. This test is conducted by a human judge who is made to engage in a natural language conversation with one human and one machine, each of which tries to appear human. The participants are placed in isolated locations.

Information technology has seen exponential growth for many decades. This has created vast improvements in memory, processing power, software algorithms, voice recognition and overall machine intelligence. It has now reached the stage where an independent judge is literally unable to tell which is the real human and which is not. Answers to certain "obscure" questions posed by the judge may appear childlike or stupid from the AI - but they are humanlike nonetheless.
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End of Part II ad we haven't even got started. Don't worry I'll address the practical immortality thing.

Part III will follow... ( that's where it gets interesting )

'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

Real products that activate dormant spiritual abilities. http://www.realmdynamics.com/#_a_174
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Sasori » Sep 26. 2012, 02:50

I predict the obesity pill will become a cluster fuck.
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 02:54

Sasori wrote:I predict the obesity pill will become a cluster fuck.



probably in the beginning but I'd say it will be dealt with in the years that follow it.
'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby mmashare-one » Sep 26. 2012, 03:26

Cool stuffs, Flyod. :idea:

Don't forget quantum computers. They use superposition ( particle can exist multiple places at the same time ) and entanglement (spooky connection between two particles million miles apart reacting instantaneously ) Robots with AI equipped with quantum computer may become the managers in the work places. Humans will try to stay above robots but will have to take their suggestions for the business. Robots may develop the concept of qualia and will attempt to put humans as sub-robotic species. Scientists need to develop the universal panic button to stop robots with AI. Once the panic button is activated the secret code should be impossible for the other robots to crack in order to prevent the robotic rebellions against humans.
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 03:28

mrdragonfly1234 wrote:Cool stuffs, Flyod. :idea:


How do you spell my name wrong when it's spelled infront of you? :evil:

'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Lassedh » Sep 26. 2012, 03:35

Well, you got a whole bunch of things people are hoping will arrive in the future, but remember that just because they are trying to make it work and hoping for it to do so, does not mean it will become reality.

I'm not quite sure what the point of this thread is? I mean, is it you just telling us what you hope for the future or how you imagine it?
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 03:39

2030 AD

AI is widespread

Despite the recent economic disruption, technology is continuing to accelerate exponentially. By 2030, the pace of change is so great that it seems as if an entire century of progress has already occurred in the first three decades of the 21st century. Scientific breakthroughs appear to be happening with startling frequency now - especially in the fields of computing, nanotechnology, medicine and neuroscience.

Workplaces are becoming highly automated, with tremendous improvements in speed, productivity and efficiency. Ever-increasing use of portable, wireless devices has led to the evolution of near-paperless offices. Meanwhile, the need for hyperfast exchange of information has created enormous demand for video conferencing. This trend is reinforced by significant reductions in air travel, due to both spiralling fuel costs and environmental concerns.

Many companies are downsizing their administrative departments and replacing them with AI. This is particularly true of call centres and other service-based roles, where customers often deal face-to-face with "virtual employees" based on automated software. Crude versions of these had been utilised as far back as the 1990s - activated by simple voice commands - but many are now being presented onscreen as fully conversant entities.
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Though lacking much in the way of personality, these sentient programs talk with "perfect" voices and are very pleasant on the ears.* They have a multitude of menu options and can usually deal with almost any query - however specific or unusual - thanks to their advanced voice and facial recognition software, in combination with extremely powerful database systems.

As competition increases, these virtual employees become a powerful marketing tool in the bid to provide the best possible customer service. In addition to mainstream companies, the adult entertainment industry gains a huge advantage from them, with enormous demand for their services. Research and development into artificial intelligence (and related hardware/software) increases greatly during this period. An added benefit of interacting with these virtual people is the elimination of caller queuing, since there is no need for physical staff anymore.

With AI playing a stronger role in society, concerns begin to arise of a "technological singularity" - as forecast by Ray Kurzweil and others. These fears prove to be exaggerated for now, in a manner similar to the Millenium Bug.


AIDS, cancer and a number of other diseases are becoming curable

The combination of stem cell research, synthetic genomics, nanotechnology and other breakthroughs has led to cures for a wide range of illnesses by now - including AIDS/HIV, the majority of cancers, motor neurone disease, arthritis and diabetes. Although Parkinson's and Alzheimer's have yet to be fully understood, dramatic progress is now being made thanks to reverse-engineering of the human brain.*

The growth of information technology in medicine has played an enormous role here. Ongoing, exponential gains in the scale, capacity and price performance of computer hardware (doubling annually) have transformed the ability to scan, analyse and decode the human body.

The tools to reprogram the information processes underlying biology are gaining a further boost from the growth of strong AI. This is being used to greatly accelerate research efforts. Automated software programs now combine the subtlety of humans with the speed, memory and knowledge sharing of non-biological intelligence.
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Full weather modeling is perfected

Zettaflop-scale computing is now available which is a thousand times more powerful than computers of 2020 and a million times more powerful than those of 2010. One field seeing particular benefit during this time is meteorology. Weather forecasts can be generated with 99% accuracy over a two week period.* Satellites can map wind and rain patterns in real time at phenomenal resolution - from square kilometres in previous decades, down to square metres with today's technology. Global warming, climate modeling and sea level predictions can also be achieved with greater detail than ever before, offering greater certainty about the long-term outlook for the planet.
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Web 4.0 is transforming the Internet landscape

Further convergence of the online and physical world has led to the emergence of "Web 4.0" - the next generation of internet. Semantic analyzing programs, having evolved into forms of AI, now perform a huge range of automated tasks for business, government and consumers. Running on massively parallel networks, these applications hunt for textual and visual data - combining the most subtle capabilities of humans (such as pattern recognition) with ways in which machines are already vastly superior (such as speed and memory).*

In addition to serving as highly advanced search engines, they are playing a major function in the real world - gathering information from the array of sensors, cameras and other tracking devices now present in the environment, on vehicles, and even on people themselves.

Although privacy and civil liberties issues are being raised, this new generation of IT promises to bring enormous benefits to society. Crimes are faster and easier to solve thanks to these intelligent virtual agents; transport and logistics are smoother and more efficient; resources can be managed and distributed more accurately.

In addition, practically every physical document in existence has now been digitally encoded, backed up and archived online. This includes full copies of all books, journals, manuscripts and other literature ever published – forming a complete repository of human knowledge going back thousands of years. These documents can be retrieved and analysed using real-time speech commands, translated from any of the world's 6,000 languages and accessed via 3D holographic imaging.

Web 4.0 is also democratising the Internet more than ever before. News agencies are finding themselves increasingly outmoded by bloggers and other social media when it comes to speed and accuracy of information.
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Stem cell pharmacies are commonplace

Stem cell pharmacies are now a common sight on high streets. These offer walk-in diagnosis, stem-cell collection and banking services for use in future medical crises. Cheap, personalised and targeted treatments are available for the rapid regeneration of body parts and organs.
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Terabit internet speeds are commonplace[/FONT]

In addition to the benefits resulting from Web 4.0 (described earlier), connection speeds have also vastly improved. Bandwidth has been growing by roughly 50% each year. Many households in the developed world now have a terabit connection.* A significant number of these connections are now appearing on people themselves, in the form of wearable or implantable devices.
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2033 AD

Holographic wall screens

Conference halls, movie theatres, stadiums and other such environments are now utilising holographic wall screens. These are basically larger and more sophisticated versions of the TV projectors which have been in use since 2020. At this stage, they remain too expensive for mainstream use in the home (except for luxury apartments owned by the rich). However, they are a relatively common sight in public venues and workplaces. Times Square in New York, Piccadilly Circus in London, and Shibuya in Tokyo now feature spectacular advertisement displays, with graphics appearing to literally "jump out" of the screen.
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2035 AD

Self-driving vehicles are widespread

In many developed countries, a new generation of self-driving vehicles is emerging. These use a combination of advanced GPS, AI and lane-changing technology to carry passengers to their destination automatically. As well as improving road safety, most of these cars are electric, or hybrid electric, reducing their impact on the environment.

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Holographic recreations of dead people

Throughout this time many dead celebrities, presidents and historical figures from the past are "resurrected" online, via the immense AI and supercomputing powers now available. This phenomenon is aided by the recent human brain simulations that have been made possible. Data mining of every single word ever spoken, written, or otherwise recorded by the person is undertaken, then analysed to recreate their character traits and emotions. This allows the construction of a highly accurate "shell" personality, surrounding a generic "core" program, run as an entirely independent AI simulation.

The project sparks much controversy when first announced (especially among the religious community) but soon gains momentum, as a whole host of actors, musicians, artists, scientists, politicians and other individuals from the past are made available.* Advanced holographic techniques - combined with real-time audio-visual interaction - make them appear as lifelike as any other person alive in the world today.

This form of computerised resurrection is soon extended and made possible for ordinary citizens wishing to preserve a loved one in digital form; though once again, it is more popular among the non-religious (and the process is generally less accurate, since the average person tends to leave behind less data, written words, video recordings and other information for use in constructing the programs). The technology involved is also expensive. It is used only by the rich for now - or in certain public locations such as museums, galleries and other venues.
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2036 AD

In-vitro meat is a rapidly growing industry

Recent advances in tissue engineering have made it possible to "grow" synthetic meat - using single animal cells.* This was first sold to the public in the late 2020s.* After years of further testing and refinement, a wide range of different meat products are available. It is now a rapidly expanding market, especially in drought-affected regions.

In-vitro meat has a number of advantages. Being just a lump of cultivated cells, it is produced without harm or cruelty to animals. It is unusually pure and healthy whilst retaining the original flavour, texture and appearance of traditional meat. Perhaps most importantly, it requires far less water and energy to produce, greatly lessening the impact on the environment.

Like GM crops, political and psychological hurdles delayed its introduction to consumers. The emerging food crisis, however, along with endorsements from animal welfare groups, later gave impetus to its development. Though still years away from completely replacing traditional meat, it is now a mainstream product in many countries.
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Alzheimer's disease is fully curable

New treatments for Alzheimer's developed in the 2020s reduced the risk of acquiring the disease by more than half.* Thanks to pioneering efforts, a further decade of progress has yielded what may be considered an effective cure. Drawing from a myriad of long-term studies, researchers have identified the precise mechanisms and processes involved in the loss of neurons and synapses in the cerebral cortex and subcortical regions. Faulty genes can be "switched off" with a new generation of drugs, while the brain itself can be regenerated using stem cells.**

This breakthrough was aided in part by reverse-engineering of the human brain, which provided researchers with a complete model of its neurological system down to the cellular level. Nanobots - first developed in 2025 - are now seeing widespread use in medical establishments and these machines can precisely target individual cells.**

The ability to combat Alzheimer's is one of the great success stories of the 2030s. It comes at a time when dementia rates are soaring: with an ageing population, the number of cases was predicted to quadruple by 2050.
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2037 AD

Quantum computers are widely available

Most government agencies, universities and research institutes now have access to this revolutionary technology, which offers spectacular computing speed and power on a completely different scale to anything used before. These machines work by making direct use of quantum mechanical phenomena, such as superposition and entanglement, to perform operations on data. In addition to being trillions of times faster than earlier computers, they can be made absolutely secure, too. The machines' encryption techniques are virtually unbreakable, due to the almost unimaginable number of instructions being executed simultaneously.
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2038 AD

Teleportation of complex organic molecules

In the early 2000s, scientists were able to transfer particles of light (with zero mass) over short distances. Further experiments in quantum entanglement led to successful teleportation of the first complete atom. This was followed by the first molecules, consisting of multiple atoms. By the late 2030s, the first complex organic molecules such as DNA and proteins are being teleported.
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2039 AD

Full immersion virtual reality


Towards the end of this decade, computers are becoming sophisticated enough to bring full immersion virtual reality to the mainstream.*

In other words, users now have the option of actually "being" in a video game and experiencing its graphics, audio and other effects (e.g. tactile feedback) in a manner that is practically indistinguishable from the real world.

This stunning breakthrough has been achieved through exponential trends in computing over the previous decades - including a billionfold improvement in processing power and price performance, combined with a 100,000-fold shrinkage of components and circuitry.*

For the first time, human brains are actually being merged with computer intelligence. Rather than viewing games on a screen, users now experience the game from within their own nervous systems, as though it were an extension of their mind. Players undergo a simple, minimally invasive procedure to insert nanobots (blood cell-sized devices) into their bodies. These microscopic machines are self-guided towards the neurons in their brain responsible for visual, auditory and other senses. Here, they remain in a dormant state, but in close proximity to the brain cells.

When the user wishes to experience a simulated reality, the nanobots immediately move into place, suppressing all of the inputs coming from the real senses, and replacing them with signals corresponding to the virtual environment. If the user decides to move their limbs and muscles as they normally would, the nanobots again intercept these neurochemical signals - suppressing the "real world" limbs from moving, and instead causing their "virtual" limbs to move within the game. This means a user can be sitting in a fixed position, while experiencing a high degree of activity and movement.
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Although most people are initially wary of these devices, they have been around in some form since at least 2025 (eg. for medical purposes) and years of testing, security and safety measures have gone into this latest generation. Detailed regulations are now in place which cover any possible eventuality. For example, a power cut means the nanobots simply detach from the neurons - automatically returning a user to the real world - while checks are constantly performed to ensure there is no danger of being "trapped" in a virtual environment.

Furthermore, the machines are not permanent and can be removed from the body altogether if desired. In any case, it is practically impossible for them to damage nerve cells or cause any lasting damage, due to their small size and limited functionality. Over the next few years, many people come to accept them as a natural part of their bodies – just as bacteria and other small objects are part of their stomach, digestion and other internal processes.

Full immersion VR isn't just limited to games. With such huge creative scope, it is being used for a whole range of applications now: from business to education, training, healthcare, engineering, design, media and entertainment.

Tourism is being revolutionised, since people no longer have to travel great distances or spend large amounts of money to explore the sights and sounds of another location – they can simply go online. For this reason, a number of travel firms are going bust around this time, or else drastically changing their business models to account for this new medium.

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Of course, that’s not to say these online holidays are intrinsically better than the real thing. Although on a different scale of technical wizardry compared to graphics of previous decades, they are still somewhat limited in their accuracy of towns and cities. At this stage, many of them lack sufficient AI, are often sparsely populated, and miss out vital details or subtle characteristics of foreign culture... things which make real-life travel such an enriching, worthwhile experience. Decades of refinement will be needed before VR is entirely convincing.

Nevertheless, this new phenomenon is so profound in its depth of interactivity – as well as sheer convenience, accessibility and ease of use – that it presents a serious threat to old-line travel agencies.

One way that the industry adapts to this is by offering more detailed, advanced and sophisticated holiday environments, for a fee. However, this becomes only a temporary solution, as certain users find a way to pirate these programs, which are then duplicated and shared online. The problem is exacerbated by groups collaborating to form their own free/open source programs, which combine the best elements from these and others, and are easy to customise by the casual user. In some cases, "hybrid" versions of holiday destinations are being created which offer wholly new, surreal and bizarrely dreamlike experiences. One such example might be a recreation of New York with a tropical coastline, populated by characters from Star Wars.

Just as the internet led to a decline in the music industry, the same is now happening to the travel industry. From the 2040s onwards there is a massive decline in air travel and overseas holiday bookings. The effects of climate change and worsening environmental crises are also playing a part here. A growing number of citizens are choosing to stay at home, with most communication and interaction being done online. The same is true of businesses – especially with regard to meetings and conferences, which are increasingly being held in virtual settings.

One area of commerce with no such troubles is the adult entertainment industry. Full immersion VR allows users to meet and interact with people in astonishingly lifelike ways. This includes virtual recreations of glamorous celebrities and film stars…

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Universal translators are ubiquitous

On-person devices that instantly translate speech, text or handwriting from any of the world's 6,000 languages are widespread by this time.* This includes contact lenses with Internet connections, capable of displaying subtitles in the wearer's field of vision.* Every website and virtual environment now has translation facilities too.

This technology has the effect of speeding up many bureaucratic/administrative procedures in business and government – as well as improving trust and cooperation at both a national and individual level.
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Nanotech fabrics are ubiquitous

Nanotech fabrics are everywhere now. They are available for a huge range of clothing, footwear and accessories, some of which are remarkable in their design. For instance, many clothes can be programmed to change their molecular structure to alter their colour, texture or style. Others have self-cleaning abilities, with micro-thin layers of disinfectant to regulate germs and dirt.

Others have more exotic properties. One such example is a material that can replicate the texture of geckos' feet. This allows people to stick to vertical surfaces, giving them Spiderman-like agility.* In addition to outdoor adventurers and climbers, a number of radical activists are making use of this. Eco-protesters for example are often seen on the news, scaling prominent buildings to unveil banners and placards. A number of government offices and corporate headquarters are being targetted in this way – raising fears of more serious incidents involving terrorists. Many companies are forced to improve their security measures.

More advanced "chameleon"-style fabric is being utilised by special forces. This comes in the form of fully-enclosing suits which change colour to match the wearer’s environment, providing a near-perfect means of camouflage.
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Part IV will follow...
'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

Real products that activate dormant spiritual abilities. http://www.realmdynamics.com/#_a_174
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 03:43

Lassedh wrote:I'm not quite sure what the point of this thread is?


Answer to your question is in OP, first couple of sentences
'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Lassedh » Sep 26. 2012, 03:45

Maybe you could elaborate on it? It still seems quite unclear to me..

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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 03:51

2040 AD

Clean energy is widespread

Widespread use of algae biofuel, nanotech fuel cells, solar PV and wind power are gradually relegating fossil fuels to obsolescence. The latter are, in any case, dwindling in availability - and have been for some time. Fusion power is also close to being developed now.
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Fusion power is nearing commercial availability

A prototype commercial fusion reactor is entering its final phase of operation.* DEMO (DEMOnstration Power Plant) is the successor to ITER and has built on the success of that project, achieving a number of major breakthroughs. Among the earlier problems which have now been solved are: containing the plasma at high enough temperatures, maintaining a great enough density of reacting ions, and capturing high-energy neutrons from the reaction without melting the walls of the interior.

Constructed from 2024 to 2033, DEMO is now close to being perfected - having undergone several years of testing, expansion and upgrades. Later this decade, it will be capable of producing a sustained output of 2 gigawatts (GW), making fusion commercially available for the first time.
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"Energy islands" are appearing in coastal regions

Many countries are now suffering chronic water shortages due to the effects of climate change and overpopulation. This is a particular problem in developing regions. Higher global temperatures are causing lakes, wells and reservoirs to run dry, even as populations continue to rise.

One strategy being used to alleviate this crisis involves compact, floating "energy islands". These combine offshore power generation with desalination plants. First demonstrated in the 2010s, significant numbers are now being deployed in tropical coastal areas, where conditions are ideal for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC).

Each island is hexagonal in shape and interlocked with other islands, forming artificial archipelagos. Wind turbines and concentrated solar power are installed on the topsides - while on the undersides, flash-evaporated seawater is used to drive turbine generators, in turn producing drinkable water.*

A single 250-megawatt OTEC plant can meet the energy demands of 250,000 households and provide 600 million litres of drinkable water each day.* Any surplus water can be used to support local agriculture and industry.

These islands also feature housing developments, fish farms, greenhouses and eco-tourism complexes, in addition to the water and power production facilities.

In the 22nd century, they will evolve into much larger versions - entire "micronations" capable of roaming the seas.
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Virtual telepathy is dominating personal communications

The first generation of brain-computer interfaces reached the consumer market in around 2010. This technology was crude and limited to begin with: more of a novelty than a serious application. Devices could perform only the simplest of operations, such as directional commands.** Some university experiments were successful in creating text messages using thought power alone,* but were slow and required bulky equipment to do so.

Advances by 2020 enabled the sending of messages via wireless headsets and visors* - but the process remained sluggish and unreliable, often demanding a high degree of concentration.*

By 2030, however, exponential progress had been made in mapping and understanding the brain and its neuroelectrical signals.* This was filtering down rapidly to the consumer market. Detailed, real-time messages were becoming possible, using non-invasive methods. The graphical interfaces used in composing messages had also been much improved, with more intuitive navigation and features.

By 2040, the technology is largely perfected for everyday use. It works well and is cheap enough to have spread to even developing countries. Privacy and security issues have been resolved, with personal firewalls able to restrict any unwanted intrusion or hacking attempts. The headsets, visors and earphones necessary for users have been miniaturised and made more comfortable. Some are even fully implantable. Whether for business or personal use, people everywhere are now enjoying a faster, more sophisticated, more private way of communicating.

This form of "virtual telepathy" - and the convergence of other network-based technologies - is radically reshaping society and culture during this time. A speculative bubble is formed on the stock markets, with investors everywhere forecasting a revolution in telecoms. This temporarily overheats the economy, resulting in a crash similar to that of the dotcom collapse of early 2000.
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Ultra-personalised healthcare

By now, most countries have established a national biorepository and genomic information system, with mandatory entry for every person.* In other words, governments now have a genetic sample of every citizen. This is needed for a variety of reasons - from national security, to public health, citizen ID, immigration control, resolution of crimes and more - but the most common use is in healthcare.

These genomic information systems are integrated with electronic health records and personal health records, allowing identification and treatment of individual disease/healthcare issues at the earliest opportunity. Hard data from these systems allow doctors and surgeons to better treat their patients, while government and researchers can target time and resources more efficiently. By utilising such a broad spectrum of information, medical schools and healthcare providers can train and employ the best mix of specialists for their patient population.

The focus of healthcare has shifted dramatically in recent years - to preventative methods, rather than traditional reactionary methods after a disease state has occurred. In addition to saving more lives, this is having tremendous economic benefits too.

One or more nanotech implants are now utilised by the majority of citizens.* Once again, these devices are tailored to meet their exact personal health requirements. For example, they can be used to identify a patient who is unable to communicate for some reason. Or they can be stored with vital clinical information about a patient during an emergency situation. They can be used as tracking devices for patients with a mental illness. They can also be programmed to monitor specific conditions - and to dispense medication as needed, while simultaneously alerting a healthcare provider.
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Claytronics are revolutionising consumer products

Claytronics - also known as programmable matter - are now embedded in countless everyday items. This technology involves the manipulation of tiny devices known as catoms (claytronic atoms). Joined electrostatically, these work in concert to produce dramatic changes at the macroscale.

Objects featuring these catoms can be radically altered in form and function. Furniture can morph into new types, for instance. A bed could suddenly become a sofa, or a large table. Chairs can be instantly moulded to precisely suit the individual. Walls, carpets, ceilings, doors and other surfaces can modify their colour or texture on demand.

Electronic devices feature this exotic material. They can be highly adaptable to their environments, for instance - altering their structure to cope with dust and heat in a desert, then later shifting to resist humidity and moisture in a jungle, or even becoming completely waterproof. They can be personalised too: devices worn on the head or ears can mould themselves to fit the individual.

Many vehicles now make use of claytronics. Car surfaces can change colour at the touch of a button. Or they can self-heal: fixing bumps, scratches and other damage. Tyres can be instantly adapted for different terrain types or weather conditions. Transparent windows can be instantly blacked-out for privacy.

Claytronics are especially popular in children's toys, with figures taking on astonishingly lifelike forms.

Various other everyday objects are now becoming highly configurable and morphable. Further into the future, claytronics will enable the creation of entire simulated humans.
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2045 AD

Humans are becoming intimately merged with machines


In some fields, the pace of technology has become so fast that humans can no longer comprehend it - unless they augment their own intelligence. This is particularly true of computing, nanotechnology, medicine and neuroscience, all of which have seen exponential progress.*

The typical home PC of today has an integrated AI system equivalent to over a billion human brains.* This machine can think for itself, communicate with its owner and suggest new ideas in ways that surpass even the greatest minds on Earth. Due to the flood of data being exchanged on the Internet and elsewhere, these computers receive literally millions of emails, status updates, news reports and other alerts each day.

The only way for a user to interpret this avalanche of information is to merge their consciousness with the machine. A growing segment of society is now turning to on-person hardware to achieve this. The most advanced method involves the use of microscopic, wireless, implantable devices linking neural activity directly to electronic circuitry. These "nanobots" have already been used in full immersion VR and certain medical procedures. The latest versions are capable of marrying AI with human intelligence in ways that combine the best aspects of both.

No monitor or projector of any kind is required for the latest generation of computers. The nanobots instead produce a virtual image of the screen which is augmented in the user's field of vision.

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This operating system is controlled by their thoughts - and those of the AI - running at speeds vastly greater than a real time physical version would allow. Thousands of individual actions can be initiated within a microsecond, thanks to the robust wireless connections between the nanobots and neurons.

If necessary, the user's entire sensory experience can be instantly shifted to a full immersion virtual reality. This is a popular choice for gaming and entertainment, but also has many practical applications in the world of business. Meetings and conferences can be hastily scheduled between vast numbers of participants from around the globe - sometimes with barely a few second's notice - and lasting only a few seconds in duration. Communicating at this speed is no longer possible using conventional means, which is creating an enormous divide between those who have the technology and those who don't.

For many people, nanobot implants are becoming permanent and essential - rather than temporary and optional - due to the bewildering speed and level of information now being encountered in day-to-day situations together with the explosive growth of AI. Military personnel, scientists and medical staff were among the first to take advantage of them, but mainstream society is now following.

People are merging with machines in various other ways, too. Nanobots can boost immune systems, for example - helping to exterminate pathogens. They can also regulate blood pressure, or repair some of the damage caused by the ageing process, or accelerate the healing of wounds. Cybernetic organs are now available that almost never fail and can filter deadly poisons. Brain-computer interfaces are increasingly used in middle class homes to open doors, control lighting and operate everyday appliances.

The most extreme cases of enhancement involve people opting for "decentralised" circulatory systems - along with a form of synthetic blood - reducing physical vulnerability still further. This particular option is only available to the rich, as it involves a highly complicated procedure that radically alters their internal anatomy. The end result is that a person can survive multiple gunshot wounds or other damage relatively easily. Certain politicians are taking advantage of this - especially those in unstable regions - along with gangland bosses and career criminals.

The line between man and machine is starting to blur. Later this century, there will no longer be a clear distinction.


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Reversible biostasis is available

Nanotechnology has continued to progress exponentially, transforming society in ways that were only recently considered science fiction.** Towards the end of this decade, it's becoming possible to actually "freeze" people in a form of suspended animation. This is achieved by shutting down their metabolism and preserving cell structures, using a complex

These microscopic machines have been around for a while now, in a variety of roles. They are already a staple of military hardware, medical equipment, entertainment devices and general-purpose computing. This latest generation reaches a new level of sophistication. Networked together in the trillions, they are self-guided through the bloodstream and into every cell. Here, they can block the molecular machinery of metabolism and tie structures together with stabilising cross-links, held firmly in place. As water is expelled and replaced with preservative fluid, nanobots pack themselves solidly around each cell, preventing any damage or deterioration.*

Once the patient has been fully stabilised in this way, they are essentially frozen in time. They can be kept in this condition for years, if necessary. To a casual observer, they would appear cold and dead.

The procedure leads to a number of useful applications. In medicine, for example, it provides the deepest possible anaesthesia, giving surgeons unlimited time to work. It can be used for medical emergencies in remote locations, stabilising a patient's condition until help arrives. In space travel it helps future astronauts with long journeys, avoiding problems of boredom and/or food supplies. It can be used in covert spying missions, where an individual might be required to lie in a restricted space for extended periods of time. More commonly, it can be used by citizens as a life extension technology, or for personal financial reasons.

The process is reversed with cell repair machines - so only very minor damage is done, without any lasting harm. Nanobots enter the patient's tissues and remove the "packing" around cells, replacing it with water. The cross-links are then removed; any damage to structures is easily repaired. Salt, ATP and blood sugar levels are then restored. Finally, the metabolic machinery is unblocked and the patient's body rapidly comes to life again.
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Part V will follow...
'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

Real products that activate dormant spiritual abilities. http://www.realmdynamics.com/#_a_174
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 03:55

Lassedh wrote:Maybe you could elaborate on it? It still seems quite unclear to me..



the purpose of this thread for you, was for you too see a great ass

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Maybe it had been a long time since you had seen one? anywho, there it is :lol:
'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

Real products that activate dormant spiritual abilities. http://www.realmdynamics.com/#_a_174
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Re: Timeline of the FUTURE! buckle up

Postby Floyduss » Sep 26. 2012, 04:42

2049 AD

Robots are a common feature of homes and workplaces


Robots are now appearing in mainstream society in a wide variety of forms and functions.* Mobile androids are especially popular amongst the elderly, widowed and those who are disabled or incapacitated - in which role they serve as companions, guides and carers. They are also popular amongst the lonely and socially anxious, who can develop relationships without the fear or hang-ups normally associated with human company.
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Sports enthusiasts are making use of robots - as running partners, for example, on squash and tennis courts, and in certain fighting/fencing games where they can simulate world-class players. Countries such as Japan and Korea have even started broadcasting their own "Robot Olympics", attracting millions of viewers.
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The cheapest android models are available for less than $1,000 now, and are stocked by many high street retailers - including hardware stores, department stores and electronics shops. Some of the more advanced models feature lifelike skin, hair, eyes, lip movement and other features. All of the personal information required to cater for their "owner" is pre-programmed into the android's brain.

Government legislation regarding these machines is complicated - and requires years to be fully implemented - but in every country, without exception, the machines adhere to three basic laws. These were postulated almost a century earlier by the science fiction writer, Isaac Asimov:

1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm
2. A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law

In urban locations, robots are usually powered by wireless energy transfer. In more remote outdoor environments they can utilise internal super-batteries and photovoltaic polymers coated on their bodies. Piezoelectric meshes in their skins - which generate small amounts of electricity through movement - provide a tertiary source of power.

Practically every warehouse and factory in the developed world now has operations run entirely by robots - which can navigate their way through aisles and shelves, identify products and load them onto delivery vans with little or no human intervention (and at speeds and efficiencies which far outpace the latter). Even most delivery trucks are now automated, thanks to advanced AI and road traffic systems, with robots unloading goods when the vehicle has reached its destination.

One particular fad at the moment is for robot cats, dogs and other domestic pets with highly realistic movements and behaviour, often indistinguishable from the real thing. These have a number of advantages - such as never getting sick or dying, never requiring food or water, never scratching or biting their owners, and never leaving a mess around the home. Certain species of tropical fish are also popular in robot form, especially those which have recently become extinct. In museums and outdoor exhibitions, breathtaking recreations of dinosaurs and other prehistoric life are now on display.
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Almost every large office and corporation features robots now - from wheeled models which distribute post, to those in reception-based roles which meet and greet visitors and assist with queries, to more advanced models capable of handling security and maintaining facilities.

In hospitals, delicate procedures involving nanotechnology devices are given over exclusively to robot machinery, capable of far greater precision than human hands.

Agriculture and food production is heavily reliant on robots. With much of the world's arable land turning to desert, hydroponic "vertical farms" are a common feature of urban centres. These carefully controlled environments are tended by robots and automated systems, and often require the analytical skills of machines rather than humans.

The physical side of military operations is handled extensively by robots now - on land, in the air, and at sea. Formidable humanoid machines equipped with a plethora of devastating firepower can be sent deep into enemy territory, left to operate autonomously for months at a time if necessary, and serving in a wide variety of roles; from solitary patrol and scouting missions, to offensive strikes involving thousands of machines working in unison. Human enemies stand little to no chance against this kind of onslaught, which is giving developed nations an overwhelming advantage over terrorist renegades.

In space, robots have probed and explored hundreds of moons in the outer solar system, and are playing a key role in the Moon colonies.
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2050 AD

Smaller, faster, hi-tech automobiles


Increased living costs and environmental regulations have resulted in smaller, cheaper, more energy-efficient cars.

More people than ever before are choosing to live and work alone, while the number of children per couple has also dropped sharply; two additional factors which have led to these lighter, more compact vehicles - a large percentage of which carry no more than one or two passengers.

Nearly all cars in the developed world are now computer-controlled, while traffic flow and road management issues are handled by advanced networks of AI. The resulting fall in congestion has boosted some economies by tens of billions of dollars.

The inherent safety of being controlled by machine, rather than human hands, allows for greater speed of travel: over 200mph on some motorways. Even when crashes do occur, which is extraordinarily rare, the built-in safety features and toughened materials (including the use of carbon nanotubes) means that fatalaties are becoming virtually non-existent.

Meanwhile, a number of the largest automakers are conducting long term research into hovering/flying vehicles, based on existing military technology.
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Major advances in air travel comfort
The vast majority of aeroplanes are now hydrogen powered, or use some combination of hydrogen and other renewable energy. In addition, travel times have greatly improved. Hypersonic engines, which entered use in 2033, have seen further development - aided by the rapid growth of artificial intelligence and the resulting advances in computer-automated design evolution. It is now possible to reach anywhere on the planet in under 2.5 hours.

The interior of some planes are breathtakingly luxurious compared to those of earlier decades. New materials have enabled the use of transparent walls and ceilings, flooding the fuselage with natural light. The seating areas are beautifully spacious and filled with interactive technology.

When flights are running at less than full capacity, unneeded seats are shuffled to the rear, where they collapse and are hidden from view. The remaining seats are then redistributed, rearranging themselves to offer everyone the maximum possible legroom. These seats also morph to fit passengers' bodies. They can re-energise travellers with vitamin and antioxidant-enriched air, mood lighting, aromatherapy and acupressure treatments.*

In the middle of the plane is a hi-tech zone offering a range of activities - from virtual golf, to conference facilities and bar/lounge settings.

phpBB [video]



2053 AD

Moore's Law reaches stunning new levels


Due to Moore's Law, desktop PCs now have AI systems equivalent to all of the human brains on Earth combined.

It is becoming difficult to distinguish human from machine intelligence, with online services now host to entities of astonishing realism and interactivity. Many programs are in fact merging with human intelligence, as the drive towards brain-computer links increases - fueled by the breakneck pace of the global economy and the need for hyperfast exchange of information.

With such raw computational power available, the consumer market has been revolutionised. Video games of today provide fantastically lifelike simulations, with deep levels of interaction.

Although full immersion VR has been available for a while now, recent advances in AI have led to Matrix-style worlds of breathtaking scale and ingenuity. Entire new societies are forming in cyberspace, with many in developed nations spending their entire leisure time engaged in them. Mounting stresses from the outside world have also served to increase demand for this form of recreation: as a means of escaping from reality itself.
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Genetically engineered "designer babies" for the rich

The ability to manipulate DNA has come a long way since its discovery in 1953. A century on, wealthy parents now have the option of creating "perfect" babies in the laboratory. This is done by picking and choosing their best hereditary traits. Gender, height, skin, hair and eye colour - along with hundreds of other characteristics - can be programmed into the embryo prior to birth. The embryo is then grown in an artificial uterus.*

The most advanced (and controversial) techniques involve manipulating the brain to improve the child's intelligence, behaviour and personality. Many conservative and religious groups decry what they see as the commercialisation of the human body.
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The vast majority of countries are democratic*

The ongoing flow of information - aided by mobile communications, social media and other technology - continues to spread democracy. The vast majority of countries now have free and fair elections.

However, the trend has begun to plateau in recent decades. Climate change is now having a significant impact on regional stability, particularly in Africa and the Middle East, where concerns over scarcity of resources have created conditions allowing dictators and authoritarian governments to make a comeback.

In any case, a number of cultures are simply more compatible with monarchies, theocracies and autocracies at the present time. These parochial nations will remain undemocratic for some time to come.
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Traditional media have fragmented and diversified

By now, traditional Western news corporations no longer exist. News gathering, analysis and distribution has instead fragmented - shifting to millions of creative individuals, bloggers, citizen journalists and small-scale enterprises. Each of these works cooperatively and seamlessly, utilising a "global commons" of instantly shared knowledge and freely available resources. This includes information retrieval not only from cyberspace but also the real world; embedded in everything from webcams and personal digital devices, to orbiting satellites, robots, vehicles, roads, street lamps, buildings, stadia and other public places.

Even people themselves have become a part of this collection process. Bionic eye implants (for example) can relay data and footage on the spot, in real time, from those willing to participate.

Traditional Western TV channels have largely disappeared, replaced by unique "personalised" web channels, covering practically any subject or combination of subjects imaginable. These are filtered and customised to the exact tastes and requirements of the individual and are viewable anywhere, at anytime. They can be highly interactive and are often experienced in virtual reality settings, rather than on a screen. This is especially true of movies, many of which have non-linear plotlines allowing the viewer to influence the outcome themselves, or even to become characters within the film.

Mass advertising, too, has undergone a revolution in Western societies. Some of the oldest outdoor media still exist - such as posters, billboards and leaflets - which continue to survive in holographic and other forms. However, online web and televisual product/service information is now accessed almost entirely from on-demand, advanced customer feedback networks along with automated, semantic web assistants. Together these can provide instant, factual and trustworthy information on a highly personalised level: automatically filtering any marketing bias or corporate propaganda which might have influenced a consumer in the past.

Despite the increased choice and empowerment, one major consequence of this fragmentation (a trend which began in the 1980s) has been increased isolation of the individual. A decrease in the shared experience of media has led to a further decline in Western family and community life.

Poorer nations are still reliant on traditional forms of media gathering and information dissemination. However, in the decades to come, many of them will begin to make the transition too - thanks to exponential trends in price performance and improved access to web technology.
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2056 AD

Fully synthetic humans are becoming technically feasible

In 2010, scientists created the first synthetic cell. Mycoplasma laboratorium was an entirely new species of bacterium, with a man-made set of genetic code, placed on a synthetic chromosome inside an empty cell. Using its new "software", the cell could generate proteins and produce new cells.*

This was followed in subsequent years by a variety of specialised organisms. Some were able to generate new vaccines and medicines; others produced biofuels and similarly useful products.

As the decades went by, larger and more complex life forms were created in the laboratory, including multi-celled animals large enough to be seen by the naked eye.

Synthetic genomics continued to advance exponentially, driven by the breakneck pace of information technology. Large animals - variants of birds, fish and mammals - became available with fully customisable limbs, sensory organs and other features, for use in a variety of commercial, scientific and industrial roles. New plants were created too, some with bizarre yet extremely useful abilities. Certain trees, for example, could be programmed to grow and shape themselves into furniture or building components.

By 2056, the number of cells that can be synthesised in a single organism is reaching almost 100 trillion: equal to the total number in the human body.* Debates are now occurring over "synthetic people" entering the population. What rights and freedoms would they have? Countless moral, ethical and legal arguments are raised.

For now, the vast majority of countries are unable to authorise the technology; the cultural lag is simply too great. Just as stem cells were controversial in the USA during the early 2000s, the creation of synthetic humans represents a step too far, for many people.

However, a small number of countries - notably China - secretly push ahead with the project. Test subjects are successfully created, then made to take part in biotechnology experiments. Although hidden from public view, rumours begin to emerge of horrific abuses.
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Part VI will follow...

'I could feel his muscle tissues collapse under my force. It's ludicrous these mortals even attempt to enter my realm.' - Mike Tyson

Real products that activate dormant spiritual abilities. http://www.realmdynamics.com/#_a_174
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